There is nothing more exciting than a music-fan to see one of their idols perform live. Although, some shows are breaking the bank, and not making it possible for this to happen.

With Beyonce recently touring the UK at an excessive £100, and the announcement of Justin Bieber coming to both London and Cardiff, there is no doubt that people will already be saving, or thinking of ways to fund their 2-hour gig of choreography and music.

“I want to go but I doubt I will have the money by Friday, they will be more than £150 I think” says Bieber fan, Jon Davies.

A lot of the generation, who are unable to work due to the legal age restriction, will often rely on parents to pay for their tickets.

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Some of these shows may be considered a once-in-a-lifetime chance to see their favourite stars, but social networkers take to Twitter to express that “they have enough money already” and “I will need to sell a limb to be able to see Biebs this year”.

So why exactly do ticket prices rise so dramatically? In 2012, The Rolling Stones were charging up to £350 for a ticket to their show, and it looks like that every artist think they can do the same due to having such a loyal fanbase.

There is a lot of psychology that goes into ticket pricing, as people would not blink at paying £50 to see their favourite artist. If the next year it increases by £20, they think to themselves that it just a small jump.

This continues to happen every year – you only notice the jump when you look back a decade ago rather than the previous year.

What are your opinions on the prices of concert tickets? Tweet us your thoughts at @Jnews_L6

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