Winston’s Wish charity has published a guide on how to talk to your children about the media coverage of events. This follows the deadly terrorist attacks in Paris last week.

 

Some of the advice was to try and encourage children to ask questions about the events.

 

Gemma Allen, who works at the charity, said, “give them clear and age appropriate language.”

 

She added, “It depends on their age and how much they have been exposed to.”

 

One of the main points were that children may “feel frightened that something bad is going to bad happen to them,” and the parent should “offer reassurance.”

 

Not to forget that “it’s okay to say I don’t know and not have all the answers.”

Attack Cafe Bonne Biere and Casa Nostra.
Image C/O: Roberto Maldeno

The Cheltenham based charity helps over 40,000 bereaved children and young people.

 

Winston’s Wish specialist programmes support children dealing with loss of family members or friends who have been affected by illness, homicide, suicide and military service.

 

Every day, more than 100 children are bereaved of a parent in the UK and approximately 25 children and young people have experienced bereavement of a parent of sibling.

 

The statistics only paint one part of the picture but can give some indication of the number of children who experience bereavement each year.

 

A resident in Cheltenham expressed her view on how parents should talk to children about the terrorist attacks in Paris.

 

“Tell them not to affect their lives as much as possible and not let terrorism win.”

 

Another local said, “I think they should be told some of the facts, not all of it.”

 

Gemma Allen discussed the issue further.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *